Casey Becking

Senior Engineer

Thoughts on Jekyll

So I’ve been using Jekyll for a few months now with this blog and other little platforms here and there. I have to say I’m amazingly impressed on how easy it is to write a blog post and get it posted and up on a server on the web. Back in the day of wordpress days i used to have to log into WordPress go author the post, right all of the HTML markup, preview the post and then if everything worked out cleanly I was able to post it to my site.

Where I want to be

So a few days ago I started to think about where I want to be with my career. I know I like writing code. I don’t know much else (kinda sad). I want to work with a company where I get to write cool code and do something positive at the same time. Be able to give back to others who may not have all the chances I have been given.

Why I contribute to Mozilla

By far the most important thing I’ve learned in my career is knowledge. I’m able to expand on the knowledge that I have learned by contributing to the open source community and letting other people critique my code in ways that I had never thought I could do before. At first this might be a little bit scary, having someone look through your code and critique every , . & and function but it’s the best thing that’s ever happened to my code.

But I run Magento.  I’m small.  Why would I get hacked?

After working with many small and mid-sized retailers in 2015, there is one thing they all have in common—the assumption that hackers won’t bother with them. Actually it’s the reverse - criminals have figured out small companies are easier to penetrate, and go after them more frequently. Why go for one big hack, of say eBay or Facebook, when you can hack 5,000+ sites which NEVER take notice? In spite of high-profile hacks such as against Apple, Cisco, or even the US Government, many online retailers still do not believe that they are at risk or have been a victim of undetected hacks by criminal groups.